Indian Journal of Palliative Care
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 CASE REPORT
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 97--100

Palliative management of malignant bowel obstruction in terminally Ill patient


1 Medical Oncology Advanced Trainee, The Townsville Hospital, QLD, Australia
2 Director, Palliative Care Unit, Redcliffe Hospital, QLD, Australia
3 Internal Medicine Advanced Trainee, Fremantle Hospital, WA, Australia

Correspondence Address:
Darshit A Thaker
Medical Oncology Advanced Trainee, The Townsville Hospital, QLD
Australia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0973-1075.68403

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Mr. P was a 57-year-old man who presented with symptoms of bowel obstruction in the setting of a known metastatic pancreatic cancer. Diagnosis of malignant bowel obstruction was made clinically and radiologically and he was treated conservatively (non-operatively)with octreotide, metoclopromide and dexamethasone, which provided good control over symptoms and allowed him to have quality time with family until he died few weeks later with liver failure. Bowel obstruction in patients with abdominal malignancy requires careful assessment. The patient and family should always be involved in decision making. The ultimate goals of palliative care (symptom management, quality of life and dignity of death) should never be forgotten during decision making for any patient.






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Online since 1st October '05
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