Indian Journal of Palliative Care
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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 23  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 88--92

Do-not-resuscitate order: The experiences of iranian cardiopulmonary resuscitation team members


1 Department of Medical Surgical Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Mashhad University of Medical Science, Mashhad, Iran
2 Department of Nursing Management, Evidence Based Care Research Center, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
3 Behavioral Sciences Research Center, School of Nursing, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
4 Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Health Sciences Research Center, School of Health, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Fatemeh Heshmati Nabavi
Department of Nursing Management, Evidence Based Care Research Center, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0973-1075.197946

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Background: One dilemma in the end-of-life care is making decisions for conducting cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This dilemma is perceived in different ways due to the influence of culture and religion. This study aimed to understand the experiences of CPR team members about the do-not-resuscitate order. Methods: CPR team members were interviewed, and data were analyzed using a conventional content analysis method. Results: Three categories and six subcategories emerged: “The dilemma between revival and suffering” with the subcategories of “revival likelihood” and “death as a cause for comfort;” “conflicting situation” with the subcategories of “latent decision” and “ambivalent order;” and “low-quality CPR” with the subcategories of “team member demotivation” and “disrupting CPR performance.” Conclusion: There is a need for the development of a contextual guideline, which is required for respecting the rights of patients and their families and providing legal support to health-care professionals during CPR.






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